fbpx
Integrating Your EHR with EZClaim

Integrating Your EHR with EZClaim

Are you or your staff having to enter every patient into your EHR program and then again into EZClaim?  There is an easier way!  Integrating your programs will put an end to duplicate data entry, saving your practice time and money!

So, what exactly is an interface and how does it work?  An interface is a way for two programs to share information.  For EZClaim clients, the interface can be set up to share data from your EHR program to EZClaim.  Your EHR can give you specifics on how to send the data to EZClaim.

In EZClaim you will have an opportunity to review the file prior to saving the data.  When you complete the import process, your claims will be created, and libraries will be updated.  In addition to creating your claims for each visit, an interface can also create Physician/Facility library entries, as well as Payer library entries, and create new or update existing patient accounts.

If you are working with one of our partner EHRs (Visit our Partner List) the integration between programs can be set up quickly and easily.  Since the process varies slightly depending on the EHR you are using, time to complete the integration request will vary.

If you are not using a partner EHR, you may still be able to integrate with EZClaim.

Following are some options:

  • In our Online Help File the format types and specifications are available for you to share with your EHR vendor.  If they can provide a file in one of the required formats you will be able to import your data.
  • You may consider using a third party to write a custom interface for you.  If you would like more information on this, contact EZClaim and we will be happy to provide information on consultants who are familiar with the EZClaim platform.

If you have questions, please submit them via email to support@ezclaim.com so a technician can review them and get back with you.

Processes for Rejections & Denials – RCM Insight

Processes for Rejections & Denials – RCM Insight

Last month we looked at tools for getting clean claims out the door on the first try.  Many billers or practices stop monitoring claims once the leave the practice management program, but this is where you are likely losing money. The unfortunate truth is you need to use the tools available to you to catch rejected and denied claims to ensure proper and timely payment.  Today we will look at rejections and denials, and the resources you have (or need) to work efficiently.

The terms rejection and denial are used interchangeably in the billing world but they have distinct differences, including how you are notified.  Let’s start with defining the differences.

Rejected Claims

  • Claims can be rejected by the clearinghouse OR the payer
  • Rejections are based on submission guidelines
  • Rejected claims have not been entered into your payers system for adjudication
  • Notified through a claim status report (ANSI 277) that comes back into most practice management programs from the clearinghouse
  • Corrections do not require a resubmission code

Denied Claims

  • Claims are denied by your payer
  • Denials are based on policy coverage
  • Denials have been accepted for adjudication and deemed unpayable
  • Notified on remittance advice (ANSI 835/ERA)
  • Payers may require a resubmission code and original reference number when submitting a corrected claim

If you are using a clearinghouse and receiving your claim status reports electronically, you will be notified quickly about rejected claims.  There are two ‘checkpoints’ that will look for errors.  The first is your clearinghouse, the second is the payer.

At each checkpoint claims will be Rejected or Accepted, these status updates come to you through a claim status report.  If your practice management system is able to process these reports (ANSI 277) your claims will be updated with the accepted or rejected information you will be able to correct any rejected claims within your practice management system.  When you see an error, start with checking who has rejected your claim.  This will be the point of contact if you have questions about the rejection or how to correct it. If you are not already, make it a daily task to get your reports, correct any rejected claims, and resubmit those claims.

When a claim has been accepted by your clearinghouse and the payer it enters the adjudication system.  This is where the payer will make a determination on payment based on the members coverage and your contract.  The denials will appear on your remittance advice with a payment or as a zero dollar payment, indicating that they have reviewed your claim and they have determined no payment is applicable.  If you are enrolled with you payer for electronic remittance advice (ERA) this file will come electronically and your practice management system will be able to list or identify denied claims.  These claims will either need to be researched further for clarification on the denial or written off.  It is vital that your practice management system can handle these scenarios appropriately so you do not lose money for payable services.

This is another scenario where technology can seem scary.  However, efficiently monitoring and working is well worth the learning curve.  If you are already sending electronically and not using the claim status report or electronic remittance advice – coordinate with your clearinghouse and practice management system to find out how these reports can save you time and money.

If you would like more information on creating workflows for rejections, denials, or enrolling with a clearinghouse, let RCM Insight help! Visit us at www.rcminsight.com to request a consultation.

[Contribution by Stephanie Cremeans with RCM Insight]

Life Cycle of a Medical Bill (Revenue Cycle 101)

Life Cycle of a Medical Bill (Revenue Cycle 101)

Life Cycle of a Medical BillThere are five ‘phases’ in the life cycle of a medical bill: Pre-appointment; Point of care; Claim submission; Insurance payment or denial; and Patient payment. This post will overview each of these phases, and could even be considered to be a “101-level” course on Revenue Cycle Management.

With high deductible health plans on the rise, the recent explosion of telehealth appointments due to COVID-19, and many other factors in play, it’s more important than ever for everyone to understand the life cycle of a medical bill, and how the process works. The healthcare revenue cycle is relevant not only to those who work in healthcare, but to the patient, too.

The revenue cycle is the series of processes around healthcare payments—from the time a patient makes an appointment to the time a provider is paid—and everything in between. One way to think of it is in terms of the life cycle of a medical bill. Although there are many ways this process can play out, this post will lay out a common example below:

1. Pre-appointment
For most general care, the first stage of the revenue cycle begins when a patient contacts a provider to set up their appointment. Generally this is when relevant patient information will begin to be collected for the eventual bill, referred to on the financial side of healthcare as a claim.

At this point a provider will determine whether the appointment and procedure will need prior authorization from an insurance company (referred to as the payer). Also, the electronic health record (EHR) used to help generate the claim is created, and will begin to accumulate further detail as the provider sends an eligibility inquiry to check into the patient’s insurance coverage.

2. Point of care
The next step in the process begins when the patient arrives for their appointment. This could include when a patient arrives for an initial consultation, an outpatient procedure, or for a follow-up exam. This could also include a Telehealth appointment.

At any of these events, the provider may charge an up-front cost. One example of this is a co-pay, which is the set amount patients pay after their deductible (if they are insured), however, there are other kinds of payments that fall into this category, too.

3. Claim submission
After the point of care, the provider completes and submits a claim with the appropriate codes to the payer. In order to accomplish that, billing staff must collect all necessary documentation and attach it to the claim. After submitting the claim to the payer, the provider’s team will monitor whether a claim has been been accepted, rejected, or denied.

[ Note: Medical coding refers to the clerical process of translating steps in the patient experience with reference numbers. The codes are normally based on medical documentation, such as a doctor’s notes or laboratory results. These explain to a payer how a patient was diagnosed and treated, and why. This information helps the payer decide how much of an encounter is covered under any given insurance plan, and therefore how much the payer will pay. ]

4. Insurance payment or denial
Once the payer receives the claim, they ensure it contains complete information and agrees with provider and patient records. If there is an error, the claim will be rejected outright and the provider will have to submit a corrected claim.

The payer then begins the review process, referred to as adjudication. Payers evaluate claims for accurate coding and documentation, medical necessity, appropriate authorization, and more. Through this process, the payer decides their financial obligation. Any factor could cause the payer to deny the claim.

If the claim is approved, the payer submits payment to the provider with information explaining details of their decision. If the claim is denied, the provider will need to determine if the original needs to be corrected, or if it makes more sense to appeal the payer’s decision.

Following adjudication, the payer will send an explanation of benefits (EOB) to the patient. This EOB will provide a breakdown of how the patient’s coverage matched up to the charges attached to their care. It is not a billing statement, but it does show what the provider charged the payer, what portion insurance covers, and how much the patient is responsible for.

5. Patient payment
The next phase occurs when the provider sends the patient a statement for their portion of financial responsibility. This stage occurs once the provider and payer have agreed on the details of the claim, what has been paid, and what is still owed.

The last step occurs when a patient pays the balance that they owe the provider for their care. Depending on the amount, the patient may be able pay it all at once, or they might need to work with the provider on a payment plan.

 

The above example represents one way the lie cycle of a medical bill can play out. Some of the ‘phases’ are often repeated. Because of the complexity of healthcare payments and the parties involved, there is not always a ‘straight line’ from patient care to complete payment. That’s why we call it the revenue cycle, and there are companies that provide systems for its management.

One of EZClaim’s partners, Waystar, aims to simplify and unify healthcare payments. Their technology automates many parts of the billing process laid out above, so it takes less time and energy for providers and their teams, and is more transparent for patients (Click here to learn more about how Waystar automates manual tasks and streamlines workflows.) When the revenue cycle is operating at its most efficient, providers can focus their resources on improving patient care—and that’s a better way forward for everyone!

For more information of how Waystar works together with EZClaim, click here.

[ Article and image provided by Waystar ]

———————————-

ABOUT EZCLAIM:
EZClaim is a medical billing and scheduling software company that provides a best-in-class product, with correspondingly exceptional service and support, and can help improve medical billing revenues. To learn more, visit their website, e-mail them at sales@ezclaim.com, or call a representative today at 877.650.0904.